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gato-iberico:

I was wondering what would happen if Naruto and Sasuke put their hand marks together…
Ramen-shuriken

gato-iberico:

I was wondering what would happen if Naruto and Sasuke put their hand marks together…

Ramen-shuriken


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Anonymous
Do you know Japanese?

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yamatoesies:

Good first date question:

"What’s your ninja way"


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narspooky:

Here it is! Sakura wearing izzyisozaki’s outfit. Sorry for the wait. I struggled with the colors as you can see and I’m so not happy with how the background came out, but I enjoyed drawing her in such a pretty outfit. I’m most happy I got to draw her pretty legs.

I don’t think I have go on about how feel about this as I’ve already done so throughout its incredible progress, but I really want to thank you for the time you put into turning my jumble of ideas into reality. It was not something very easy for me to present, and you mirrored my efforts in that.

narspooky:

Here it is! Sakura wearing izzyisozaki’s outfit. Sorry for the wait. I struggled with the colors as you can see and I’m so not happy with how the background came out, but I enjoyed drawing her in such a pretty outfit. I’m most happy I got to draw her pretty legs.

I don’t think I have go on about how feel about this as I’ve already done so throughout its incredible progress, but I really want to thank you for the time you put into turning my jumble of ideas into reality. It was not something very easy for me to present, and you mirrored my efforts in that.


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theyuniversity:

pronunciation | nats-ka-‘shE (nahtzkah-SHEE)Japanese | 懐かしいtip | The final pronunciation doesn’t really have an “oo” sound in it.

theyuniversity:

pronunciation | nats-ka-‘shE (nahtzkah-SHEE)
Japanese | 懐かしい
tip | The final pronunciation doesn’t really have an “oo” sound in it.


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hollybailey:


It was one of the most searing images of the war in Iraq: a tiny girl, splattered in blood and screaming in horror after her parents had been shot and killed by American soldiers who fired on the family car when it failed to yield for a foot patrol in the northern town of Tel Afar.
Taken by Getty Images photographer Chris Hondros, who was embedded with the patrol, the January 2005 photo offered powerful visual testimony to the horrific impact of the conflict on Iraqi citizens. It came as the American public was beginning to question the rising death toll and purpose of a war that was starting to look unwinnable.
Hondros was inured to the chaos of war. By then, he was a veteran combat photographer who had served as a witness for the world on the frontlines of conflicts in far-away places like Afghanistan, Pakistan, Liberia and Sierra Leone. But Hondros wasn’t merely fueled by the adrenaline of covering war. He was there to document the impact of conflict on people, both soldiers and civilians, to discover something deeper about humanity through war.
“He tried to make sense of what was happening around him, to really understand the chaos that he often found himself in,” recalled Sandy Ciric, a longtime photo editor at Getty Images who was one of Hondros’s closest friends and colleagues. “He was a professional, and he knew it was his job to document. But he was also human. He was really affected by the people he met and the things he saw… He was always thinking and writing and shooting and working, trying to understand the terrible complexity of war and the impact it had on people.”
So it was a horrible and painful twist of fate that a photographer so determined to show the world the human impact of conflict died trying to do just that. Hondros was killed in a mortar attack along with fellow photojournalist Tim Hetherington in April 2011 while covering the war in Libya.
He left behind an adoring mother, a fiance and a tight-knit group of friends and colleagues who were devastated by his death but also determined to preserve his memory and legacy as one of the most promising photojournalists of a generation who died too soon.
It’s that career that is the subject of  “Testament,”  a new book of Hondros’s work published by Powerhouse Books and Getty Images (which is donating its portion of the proceeds to The Chris Hondros Fund). The book, edited by Ciric and Pancho Bernasconi of Getty Images and Christina Piaia, Hondros’s fiance, features not only images that Hondros took over more than a decade of covering conflict, but also his own words, taken from stories and essays he wrote about his experiences on the road as he sought to understand what he was seeing through his lens.

I previewed the new Chris Hondros Book, which is out today (via Yahoo News)

hollybailey:

It was one of the most searing images of the war in Iraq: a tiny girl, splattered in blood and screaming in horror after her parents had been shot and killed by American soldiers who fired on the family car when it failed to yield for a foot patrol in the northern town of Tel Afar.

Taken by Getty Images photographer Chris Hondros, who was embedded with the patrol, the January 2005 photo offered powerful visual testimony to the horrific impact of the conflict on Iraqi citizens. It came as the American public was beginning to question the rising death toll and purpose of a war that was starting to look unwinnable.

Hondros was inured to the chaos of war. By then, he was a veteran combat photographer who had served as a witness for the world on the frontlines of conflicts in far-away places like Afghanistan, Pakistan, Liberia and Sierra Leone. But Hondros wasn’t merely fueled by the adrenaline of covering war. He was there to document the impact of conflict on people, both soldiers and civilians, to discover something deeper about humanity through war.

“He tried to make sense of what was happening around him, to really understand the chaos that he often found himself in,” recalled Sandy Ciric, a longtime photo editor at Getty Images who was one of Hondros’s closest friends and colleagues. “He was a professional, and he knew it was his job to document. But he was also human. He was really affected by the people he met and the things he saw… He was always thinking and writing and shooting and working, trying to understand the terrible complexity of war and the impact it had on people.”

So it was a horrible and painful twist of fate that a photographer so determined to show the world the human impact of conflict died trying to do just that. Hondros was killed in a mortar attack along with fellow photojournalist Tim Hetherington in April 2011 while covering the war in Libya.

He left behind an adoring mother, a fiance and a tight-knit group of friends and colleagues who were devastated by his death but also determined to preserve his memory and legacy as one of the most promising photojournalists of a generation who died too soon.

It’s that career that is the subject of “Testament,” a new book of Hondros’s work published by Powerhouse Books and Getty Images (which is donating its portion of the proceeds to The Chris Hondros Fund). The book, edited by Ciric and Pancho Bernasconi of Getty Images and Christina Piaia, Hondros’s fiance, features not only images that Hondros took over more than a decade of covering conflict, but also his own words, taken from stories and essays he wrote about his experiences on the road as he sought to understand what he was seeing through his lens.

I previewed the new Chris Hondros Book, which is out today (via Yahoo News)


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yahoonewsphotos:

'Testament' is a collection of photographs and writing by late photojournalist Chris Hondros spanning over a decade of coverage from most of the world’s conflicts since the late 1990s, including Kosovo, Afghanistan, the West Bank, Iraq, Liberia, Egypt, and Libya.

Through Hondros’ images, we witness a jubilant Liberian rebel fighter exalt during a firefight, a U.S. Marine remove Saddam Hussein’s portrait from an Iraqi classroom, American troops ride confidently in a thin-skinned unarmored Humvee during the first months of the Iraq war, “the probing eyes of an Afghan village boy,” and “rambunctious Iraqi schoolgirls enjoying their precious few years of relative freedom before aging into more restricted adulthoods.”

Hondros was not just a front-line war photographer, but also a committed observer and witness, and his work humanizes complex world events and brings to light shared human experiences. Evident in his writings, interspersed throughout, Hondros was determined to broaden our understanding of war and its consequences.

This unyielding determination led Hondros to take dozens of trips to Iraq and Afghanistan, even as the news turned elsewhere. During these “routine” trips, Hondros examined and observed daily life in these war-torn societies. His inventive Humvee picture series frames the ever-changing landscapes of these countries, offering a glimpse into the daily lives of those most affected by conflict.

"One of the ongoing themes in my work, I hope, and one of the things I believe in, is a sense of human nature, a sense of shared humanity above the cultural layers we place on ourselves [which don’t] mean that much compared to the human experience."
—Chris Hondros

As a photographer working in the world’s most difficult and dangerous places, Chris Hondros had the distinctive ability to connect his viewers with people embroiled in far-flung and sometimes obscure conflicts. He recognized the shared humanity among those affected by war, regardless of culture or beliefs, and he was determined to share their challenges to the wider world in the hope of provoking thought, raising awareness, and fostering understanding.

In the introduction to the book, Getty Images co-founder and CEO Jonathan Klein writes, “Chris believed that his work could and would make a difference. He dedicated and ultimately lost his life in pursuit of that belief. I have no doubt that Chris was correct. Images can and do influence public opinion, galvanize people and societies, and force governments to change. They bring much-needed focus and attention to the suffering of people who are otherwise unable to communicate their plight.”

Inspired by his life, work, and vision—The Chris Hondros Fund endeavors to bring light to shared human experiences by supporting and protecting photojournalists. Through their generous support, Getty Images’ proceeds from the sale of the book will be donated to the Fund. For more information please visit www.chrishondrosfund.org.

The book is available beginning April 2014 at powerHouse Books.

(From ‘Testament’, photograph by Chris Hondros/Getty Images, text by
Chris Hondros, published by powerHouse Books., Photo of Chris Hondros by Scout Tufankjian)

See more images from ‘Testament’ and our other slideshows on Yahoo News!


See the RELATED STORY by Holly Bailey/Yahoo News


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Three weeks ago, my friend Joe lost his father to a long battle with cancer. Earlier this week, Joe’s mother got in a fatal car accident which resulted in her death. Joe is a senior in high school and most of his money was already going towards paying bills for his family. Unfortunately, now he has no more close family and has the responsibility of paying for the funerals for both of his parents.
I know most of you probably won’t be able to help, but I knew it couldn’t hurt to spread the word. My school and community are trying to come together to raise money to help him out with the funeral expenses.
If there is any chance you are able to make any sort of financial donation to helping him out, please contact me on my personal blog for more information. Something like a $10-20 donation could help tremendously, but please remember that even the smallest amounts (even $1 if that’s all you can do) will be greatly appreciated. 
Even if you can’t donate money, it would be wonderful if you could spread the word. Prayers and positive vibes sent his way could also be a great help. This is a tragic thing for someone at his age to be going through. Please do anything you can to help whether it’s donations, spreading the word, or prayers for him.

Three weeks ago, my friend Joe lost his father to a long battle with cancer. Earlier this week, Joe’s mother got in a fatal car accident which resulted in her death. Joe is a senior in high school and most of his money was already going towards paying bills for his family. Unfortunately, now he has no more close family and has the responsibility of paying for the funerals for both of his parents.

I know most of you probably won’t be able to help, but I knew it couldn’t hurt to spread the word. My school and community are trying to come together to raise money to help him out with the funeral expenses.

If there is any chance you are able to make any sort of financial donation to helping him out, please contact me on my personal blog for more information. Something like a $10-20 donation could help tremendously, but please remember that even the smallest amounts (even $1 if that’s all you can do) will be greatly appreciated. 

Even if you can’t donate money, it would be wonderful if you could spread the word. Prayers and positive vibes sent his way could also be a great help. This is a tragic thing for someone at his age to be going through. Please do anything you can to help whether it’s donations, spreading the word, or prayers for him.


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